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CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 1 of 32

Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD

Name

Gender Date of birth

Address

Telephone number

Name of social worker completing assessment:

Child aged 0–2 years

Health

Education

Emotional &

Behavioural

Development

Identity

Family & Social

Relationships

Social

Presentation

Selfcare Skills

Basic Care

Ensuring

Safety

Emotional

Warmth

Stimulation

Guidance

& Boundaries

Stability

CHILD

Safeguarding

and promoting

welfare

Family

History

& Functioning

Wider Family

Housing

Employment

Income

Family’s Social

Integration

Community

Resources

CHILD’S DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS

PARENTING CAPACITY

FAMILY & ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

Undertaking the core assessment 3

Sources of information 4

Details concerning a core assessment 5

Background details concerning the child 6

Key research sources 7

Child’s developmental needs 8

Health 8

Education 10

Emotional and Behavioural Development: Selfcare skills 12

Identity and Social Presentation 14

Family and Social Relationships 16

Issues affecting parents’/carers’ capacities to respond appropriately

to the child’s needs 18

Family and Environmental factors 19

Plan for the child in need 22

Summary of child’s developmental needs and strengths 23

Summary of parenting capacity: Needs and strengths 24

Summary of wider family and environmental factors: Needs and strengths 25

Analysis of the information gathered during the core assessment 26

The child: Objectives and plans 27

The parent(s)/carer(s): Objectives and plans 28

Wider family and environmental factors: Objectives and plans 29

Views of all parties 30

Parents’/carers’ comments 31

Management information 32

Contents

2 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 3 of 32

l The Core Assessment Record provides a framework for systematically recording the findings

from the core assessment. Whilst the Assessment Record provides some guidance on

the areas that should be covered in a core assessment, it is a tool and should not be used as

a substitute for a professionally informed assessment process, analysis and judgement.

l The questionnaires and scales published in the accompanying materials to the Framework

for the Assessment of Child in Need and their Families may be useful in obtaining

the information in specific areas (Department of Health, Cox and Bentovim, 2000). The

Assessment Record indicates where particular questionnaires and scales may be useful.

Practitioners may also choose to use other assessment tools to assist them.

l The Core Assessment Record may be completed in a number of different ways. For example,

the social worker may wish to discuss each area with the family before completing the record

and then share this with the family. Alternatively, having undertaken some or all of the core

assessment the social worker may wish to complete the form with the child’s parents or carers.

l Parents and carers invariably want to do the best for their children. Completing the

record will help social workers to recognise the strengths that families have as well as identifying

areas where they may need further help.

l Completing the core assessment should always be done in a way that helps parents or carers,

children and other relevant family members to have their say and encourages them to

take part. Space has been provided within the forms for parents/carers and older children

to be involved in the assessment.

l It is expected that other agencies should be involved, as appropriate, during the core assessment

process. Parental permission to contact other agencies should be obtained except in

cases where the safety of the child would be jeopardised (paragraphs 7.27 to 7.38 of Working

Together to Safeguard Children provides guidance on this issue). Permissions should

be obtained from other agencies to share their information with the family.

l It is important that all sections of the Core Assessment Record are considered carefully.

The analysis of the information gathered should be recorded in the plan. In some cases it

will not be appropriate to complete particular sections, and in such situations the reason

why should be recorded in the summary section. The information gathered is then used

to develop case objectives and plans.

l In competing the record, it should be possible to see what help and support the child and

family need, and which agencies might be best placed to give that help. This might

include more detailed assessments of specific issues.

l Families should be provided with the following information:

Complaints procedures date provided

Information on access to records date provided

Other relevant/available information date provided

(please specify)

Undertaking the core assessment

Dates child and family members seen

Name Date(s) seen

Agencies consulted/involved as part of the assessment

Agency Person Contact number

Questionnaires, Scales or other Instruments used in assessment

Questionnaire/Scale/Instrument Date(s) used

Specialist Assessments

Agency/person who undertook the Purpose of the assessment Date(s) assessment

assessment commissioned and completed

Sources of information

4 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 5 of 32

D1 What is the reason for undertaking the core assessment?

Details concerning a core assessment

D2 Are there specific communication needs for child/parent (eg. impairment affecting communication or English is

not the first language)?

If so, what action has been taken to address this ie. use of an interpreter or a signer?

Date core assessment started

Date core assessment ended

The Government’s Objectives for Childen’s Social Services (1999) require the core assessment to be completed

within 35 working days.

6 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

B/K1 Significant relatives who are not part of the child’s household

Birth father Parental responsibility Yes n No n Name

Address

Brothers and sisters

Name(s) Age Address

Others (please specify )

Name(s) Relationship to child Address

Background details concerning the child

(This information supplements the information recorded on the Referral and Initial Assessment Record)

B/K2 If the child has any health conditions, impairment(s) or a genetically inherited condition – please give details

(include for example: physical disability, sensory impairment, Down’s syndrome, encephalitis, autism, sickle cell

anaemia, cystic fibrosis)

B/K3 Key events which may have had an impact on the child

(for example: death of brother or sister, circumstances surrounding conception)

B/K4 Other key events experienced by siblings or other family members which may affect the child

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 7 of 32

Key research sources

The Assessment Record is based on research information drawn from a number of sources

Assessment

Cleaver H, Wattam C and Cawson P (1998) Assessing Risk in Child Protection. NSPCC, London.

Department of Health, Department for Education and Employment and Home Office (2000) Framework for the

Assessment of Child in Need and their Families. The Stationery Office, London.

Department of Health, Cox A and Bentovim A (2000) The Family Assessment Pack of Questionnaires and Scales.

The Stationery Office, London.

The NSPCC and University of Sheffield (2000) The Child’s World: Assessing Children in Need. Training and

Development Pack. NSPCC, London.

Sinclair R, Garnett L and Berridge D (1995) Social Work and Assessment with Adolescents. National

Children’s Bureau, London.

Ward H (ed) (1995) Looking After Children: Research into Practice. HMSO, London.

Child development

Department of Health (1996) Focus on Teenagers: Research into Practice. HMSO, London.

Department of Health (1997) Young Carers: Making a Start. Department of Health, London.

Fahlberg VI (1994) A Child’s Journey Through Placement. BAAF, London.

Jones DPH (forthcoming) Communicating with children who may have been traumatised or maltreated.

Rutter R and Rutter M (1992) Developing Minds: Challenge and Continuity across the Life Span.

Penguin, Harmondsworth.

Smith PK and Cowie H (1993) Understanding Children’s Development (2nd Edition). Blackwell, Oxford.

Varma VP (1991) The Secret Life of Vulnerable Children. Routledge, London.

Parenting capacity

Cleaver H, Unell I and Aldgate J (1999) Children’s Needs — Parenting Capacity: The impact of parental

mental illness, problem alcohol and drug use, and domestic violence on children’s development.

The Stationery Office, London.

Falkov A, Mayes K, Diggins M, Silverdale N and Cox A(1998) Crossing Bridges — Training resources for working with

mentally ill parents and their children. Pavilion Publishing, Brighton.

Reder, P and Lucey, C (1995) Assessment of Parenting: Psychiatric and psychological contributions.

Routledge, London.

Family and environmental factors

Cochran M (ed) (1993) Parenting: an ecological perspective. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey.

Cochran M, Larner M, Riley D, Gunnarsson L and Henderson C (eds) (1990) Extending families: the social

networks of parents and their children. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Jack G and Jordan B (1999) Social capital and child welfare. Children and Society. 13 (5): 242-256.

Wallace SA, Crown JM, Berger M and Cox AD (1997) Child and Adolescent Mental Health. In Stevens A and Rafferty J

(1997) Health Care Needs Assessment: 2nd Series. Radcliffe Medical Press, Oxford.

Iwanec D (1995) The emotionally abused and neglected child. Wiley, Chichester.

Stevenson O (1998) Neglected Children: Issues and Dilemmas. Blackwell Science, Oxford.

8 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Yes No

H1 The child is normally well n n

H2 Weight/height at expected level n n

H3 Hearing/vision is satisfactory n n

H4 Child eats well n n

H5 Child has a regular sleep pattern n n

H6 Has been appropriately immunised n n

H7 Symptoms/signs of exposure to

drugs/alcohol in utero n n

H8 Has an ongoing health problem

(ie diabetes, asthma, epilepsy) n n

H9 Has had many accidental injuries n n

H10 Usually happy with parent/carer n n

H11 Other n n

Child’s developmental needs

Health

Normally well is defined

as unwell for 1 week or

less in the last 6

months.

Details of

immunisations in health

record held by parents.

Immunisations 2-4

months:

Diphtheria/Tetanus/

Whooping cough;

Polio;Hib;

meningococcal C

vaccine

12-15 months:

Measles/Mumps/

Rubella.

Babies of substance

using mothers may

suffer: tremors

screaming,

Child’s needs Summary/clarification of child’s needs

Basic care Yes No

H12 Child is given an adequate and

nutritious diet including fluids n n

H13 Child is bathed regularly n n

H14 Child’s teeth regularly cleaned n n

H15 Child is dressed to suit the weather n n

H16 Home, including child’s bed is clean n n

H17 Child’s routine medical appointments

are generally kept n n

H18 Appropriate contact with the health

visitor and G.P. n n

H19 Parent has adequate explanation as

to why immunisations not up to date n n

H20 Other n n

Ensuring safety

H21 Injuries have always been

appropriately attended to n n

H22 Parent takes action to prevent

common accidents n n

H23 Child is protected from abuse n n

H24 Marks on the child’s body have an

acceptable explanation n n

H25 Other n n

Disabled children can

face barriers in

accessing routine

medical care.

All children should be

taken regularly to the

dentist from 2 years of

age.

To gather further

information consider

using the Home

Conditions

Assessment.

Black families may have

less access to

preventative and

support services than

white families.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 9 of 32

Social worker’s summary of the child’s needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

H26 Child is usually with a parent/carer

when awake n n

H27 Parents/carers give comfort when

child is ill/distressed/injured n n

H28 Other n n

Stimulation

H29 Child is encouraged to be active

within a safe environment n n

H30 Child is taken out regularly n n

H31 Other

Guidance and Boundaries

H32 Child’s nappy is changed regularly n n

H33 Parent/carer tries to ensure that

the child gets adequate and

undisturbed sleep n n

H34 Parent/carer provides the child

with an adequate and nutritious

diet n n

H35 Other n n

Stability

H36 Parent/carer provides regular and

consistent routines for the child

(mealtimes, bedtimes, bath times) n n

H37 Other n n

Poverty and poor social

conditions are related to

poor child health and

development and

increased risk of

accidents.

Disabled children may

need special help or

equipment for exercise.

Parents with severe

problems may not

always be able to

concentrate long

enough to complete the

baby’s feeding or nappy

change.

Eating and sleeping

patterns need to be set

within the context of

the family’s culture.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

10 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Education

E1 Child is making expected progress

with speech and language n n

E2 Child responds appropriately to

sounds and voices n n

E3 Child shows curiosity about his/her

environment, people, toys etc n n

E4 Child plays at an age-appropriate

level n n

E5 Child responds to instructions

during second year of life n n

E6 Other n n

Soon after birth children

respond to sound and

voices. By 2 there is an

increase in vocabulary.

After 6 months children

start to engage in social

play. Pretend play starts

at approx. 12–15

months.

Consider referring

children with

communication

difficulties for a

specialist assessment

(i.e. speech therapist).

Child’s needs Summary/clarification of child’s needs

Basic care Yes No

E7 Child has a range of safe toys/

objects to play with n n

E8 Child has frequent opportunities

to communicate/play with others n n

E9 Other n n

Ensuring safety

E10 Child has somewhere safe to play

at home n n

E11 Parent ensures that out of home

play areas are safe n n

E12 Child is closely supervised by an

adult in and out of the home n n

E13 Other

When a child has not

reached an expected

developmental

milestone consider

referring for a specialist

assessment.

When a parent has a

learning disability only

15% of children are

similarly affected.

Safe outside play areas

are important because

accidents are the major

cause of death amongst

children.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 11 of 32

Social worker’s summary of the child’s needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

E14 Parent responds to the child’s

efforts to communicate/talk n n

E15 Parent enjoys communicating

with the child n n

E16 Parent shows approval of the

child’s achievement n n

E17 Other n n

Stimulation

E18 Parent talks, sings and plays

with the child n n

E19 Parent reads to/looks at books

with/watches TV with the child n n

E20 Child has some freedom to

explore his/her environment n n

E21 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

E22 Toys/play are suitable to

child’s stage of development n n

E23 Child is ‘overstimulated’ e.g.

given too many toys at once n n

E24 Distractions are minimised n n

E25 Other n n

Stability

E26 Parent/carer consistently

encourages the child to learn n n

E27 Child’s toys/books are looked after n n

E28 Other n n

Parents own problems

may mean they respond

less frequently to their

child’s cues.

To gather further

information consider

using the Family

Activity Scale.

All children need

adequate and

appropriate

stimulation.

When a child has

profound or complex

impairments it may be

necessary to check with

a specialist before

completing this section.

The key to children’s

educational progress is

a parent or significant

adult who takes an

interest in their learning

and offers praise and

encouragement.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

12 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Emotional and Behavioural Development: Selfcare skills

Yes No

B&S1 Child is usually happy n n

B&S2 When the child is crying he/she

can usually be readily comforted n n

B&S3 Child is often wary/anxious n n

B&S4 Temper tantrums lasting 15 mins

occur daily n n

B&S5 Child readily engages in joint

play with familiar adults n n

B&S6 Child can play quietly for at

least brief periods n n

B&S7 Mealtimes and bedtimes are

generally hassle free n n

B&S8 Child is beginning to feed/dress

him/herself n n

B&S9 Other

Children who show

poor attachment may

be suffering from

substance withdrawal

symptoms.

Short lived temper

tantrums are to be

expected.

To gather further

information consider

using The Parenting

Daily Hassles Scale.

Children who are

abused or witness

domestic violence may

wake up screaming or

crying.

Child’s needs Summary/clarification of child’s needs

Basic care Yes No

B&S10 Parents are responsive to the

child’s emotional needs n n

B&S11 Disagreements between parents/

carers are resolved in nonviolent

ways n n

B&S12 Other n n

Ensuring safety

B&S13 Child is left with strangers n n

B&S14 Child is smacked or physically

chastised n n

B&S15 Parent/carers have sought help or

advice if they are experiencing

difficulties in managing the

child’s behaviour n n

B&S16 Other n n

Children as young as 18

months can become

distressed during angry

exchanges between

adults.

Most at risk are children

who are victims of

aggression, or are

neglected.

Children who are

abused or witness

domestic violence are

particularly

traumatised.

Younger or disabled

children may be at

greater risk than older,

more articulate children

because they are less

able to tell anyone

about their experiences

and distress.

A disabled child may

not protest when left

with strangers because

they have been handled

by many unknown

people. Nonetheless it

remains a matter for

concern.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 13 of 32

Social worker’s summary of the child’s needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

B&S17 Child is comforted when distressed n n

B&S18 Child is exposed to frequent

criticism/hostility n n

B&S19 Parent takes pleasure in appropriate

physical contact with their child n n

B&S20 Other n n

Stimulation

B&S21 Child is often exposed to

parental emotional distress n n

B&S22 Child is encouraged to play

with others n n

B&S23 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

B&S24 Parent uses a variety of positive

methods to get the child to behave n n

B&S25 There are clear family rules and

limits about behaviour n n

B&S26 Child is helped to control his/her

feelings n n

B&S27 Child is taught how to behave

with other children and adults n n

B&S28 Other n n

Stability

B&S29 Child’s behaviour is responded

to in a relatively consistent manner n n

B&S30 Parents/carers generally support

each other in applying family rules n n

B&S31 Parent responses to the child

are reasonably predictable n n

B&S32 Other n n

Depression can affect

parents’ capacity to care

about their child.

Positive methods for

encouraging good

behaviour include:

praise, negotiation,

modelling, rewards,

distraction, play,

persuasion and

explanation.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

14 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Identity and Social Presentation

Yes No

ID&P1 Child is self confident n n

ID&P2 Child has a positive view of self n n

ID&P3 Child takes pride in his/her

achievements n n

ID&P4 Child responds to own name by

1 year and knows own name

by 2 years n n

ID&P5 Child approaches familiar persons

ID&P6 Child asserts ‘rights’ with sibs/

peers by 2 years n n

ID&P7 After 2 years, the child knows

his or her own gender n n

ID&P8 Other n n

9-12 months is the

beginning of self

identity.

At end of second year

children can recognise

self in mirror and are

aware of physical

differences.

At 6–9 months children

reach for familiar

persons.

By 12–18 months

children develop a

sense of me and mine.

Child’s needs Summary/clarification of child’s needs

Basic care Yes No

ID&P9 Child’s clothes are clean:

not soiled with urine, excrement,

or food n n

ID&P10 Child’s clothes are routinely

washed n n

ID&P11 The name by which the child is

known is consistent within the

family n n

ID&P12 Other n n

Ensuring safety

ID&P13 Child’s dress is appropriate

for age, gender, culture and

religion and where necessary

impairment n n

ID&P14 Parents help the child to

distinguish familiar and trusted

people from strangers n n

ID&P15 Other n n

Children who grow up

in families which

experience many

stresses and problems

will need positive

messages to avoid

developing a negative

self image and poor self

esteem. Disabled

children need even

more help.

Disabled children have a

right to be dressed

appropriately but their

dress should not

impede movement,

endanger stability or

aggravate their skin.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 15 of 32

Social worker’s summary of the child’s needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

ID&P16 Parent often shows spontaneous

affection to the child n n

ID&P17 Child is valued for his/her self n n

ID&P18 Parent shows pride in the child n n

ID&P19 Other n n

Stimulation

ID&P20 Child is encouraged to do

appropriate things for him/

herself n n

ID&P21 Child is offered simple choices n n

ID&P22 Child’s efforts to be

independent are respected n n

ID&P23 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

ID&P24 Child is taught to respect

others and other’s possessions n n

ID&P25 Other n n

Stability

ID&P26 Child is accepted as a

member of the family n n

ID&P26 Child is included in family

celebrations, e.g. birthdays n n

ID&P27 Child is reassured when

separated from the parent n n

ID&P28 Other n n

For children to develop

a positive self image

they need to feel loved

and valued for

themselves.

In all cultures disabled

children may be treated

as younger than their

actual age. This is a

particular risk for a

learning disabled child.

Children who are

routinely rejected come

to see themselves as

unloved and unlovable.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

16 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Family and Social Relationships

Yes No

F1 Child shows attachment behaviour

to main carers by 1 year n n

F2 Child is relaxed in the presence

of main carers n n

F3 Child plays happily with siblings n n

F4 By 2 child is gentle and kind to

other children and animals n n

F5 By 2 child is beginning to share

with familiar peers and siblings n n

F6 By 2 child is playing comfortably

along-side peers n n

F7 Other n n

By 1 year children are

able to distinguish

strangers from familiar

people.

Strong attachment

relationships can be

formed with a number

of carers.

At 2 children develop an

awareness of the

emotions of others.

Child’s needs Summary/clarification of child’s needs

Basic care Yes No

F8 A small number of familiar

and appropriate adults look after

the child n n

F9 Parents behave towards child in

a way that encourages a strong,

positive relationship to develop n n

F10 Parents/carers spend sufficient

time with the child to sustain a

strong relationship n n

F11 Other n n

Ensuring safety

F12 Siblings are generally gentle with

the child n n

F13 Parents/carers monitor interactions

between child and siblings n n

F14 Other n n

Parental problems

may result in

children being

looked after by a

large number of

different people.

A good attachment

relationship is

associated with parents

being emotionally

available and consistent

in their parenting.

Love and affection are

shown in different ways

depending on culture

and individual

characteristics.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 17 of 32

Social worker’s summary of the child’s needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

F15 Parent/carer responds

sensitively to the child n n

F16 Parent/carer encourages

affectionate family relationships n n

F17 Other n n

Stimulation

F18 Child is taken to meet other

parents and children n n

F19 Child visits family friends and

relatives n n

F20 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

F21 Parent’s relationships with others

provides a good example to child n n

F22 Child is taught to take turns n n

F23 Child is encouraged to negotiate n n

F24 Child is discouraged from

violent or cruel behaviour n n

F25 Other n n

Stability

F26 There is a stable pattern of care

in the child’s day to day life n n

F27 Child has a long-term, stable

relationship with at least 1 adult n n

F28 There is continuity of carers n n

F29 A limited number of known,

safe adults deliver intimate care n n

F30 Other n n

The presence of a

supportive adult can

help stressed parents to

cope.

For a disabled child,

practical and social

barriers can make

taking the child out

difficult, but it remains

essential to the child’s

wellbeing.

Of central importance

to a child in all families

is a loving and

protective relationship.

Continuity and stability

are key aspects of the

attachment process.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

18 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Social worker’s summary of how the above issues have an impact on the parents’/carers’ capacities to respond

appropriately to the child’s needs

Issues affecting parents’/carers’ capacities to respond

appropriately to the child’s needs

C1 Illness:

Physical n n

Mental n n

C2 Disability:

Physical n n

Learning n n

Sensory impairment n n

C3 Period in care during

childhood n n

C4 Childhood abuse n n

C5 Known history of child abuse n n

C6 Known history of violence n n

C7 Problem drinking/ drug use n n

C8 Other n n

Parental issues Yes No Professional/agency Note identity of parent/carer for whom the issue

involved is relevant. Record strengths and difficulties

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 19 of 32

Family and Environmental Factors which may impact on the child and

parenting capacity

Family History Yes No

FE1 Has a member of the household

experienced a stressful childhood? n n

Note childhood abuse; in care n n

FE2 Have the family suffered a

traumatic loss or crisis which is

unresolved? (e.g. bereavement) n n

FE3 Other n n

Family Functioning

FE4 Does child’s impairment/behaviour

have a negative impact on siblings? n n

FE5 Child’s impairment/behaviour affects

parent(s) capacity to continue care n n

FE6 Does a member of the household

experience:

poor mental health n n

poor physical health n n

behaviour problem n n

physical disability n n

learning disability n n

sensory impairment n n

problem alcohol/drug use n n

FE7 Has an adult member of the household

got a history of violence? n n

FE8 Are there frequent family rows? n n

FE9 Other. n n

Wider Family

FE10 Do wider family provide:

Practical help n n

Emotional support n n

Financial help n n

Information and advice n n

FE11 Is there an adult in the home who

helps the parent care for the child? n n

FE12 Other. n n

Include all household

and relevant family

members, living in or

out of the home, when

exploring family history

and functioning.

To gather further

information consider

using: The Recent Life

Events Questionnaire;

A genogram; An ecomap.

How parents bring up

their children is rooted

in their own childhood

experiences.

Consider whether a

separate carers’

assessment is

required.

Both positive and

negative parenting

styles can be passed

from one generation to

another.

To gather further

information consider

using: The Adult Wellbeing

Scale; The

Alcohol Scale.

Wider family may

extend beyond blood

relatives to include

people who feel like

family to parent or

child.

Additional details as appropriate

Note identity of person for whom the issue is

relevant

20 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Housing Yes No

FE13 Is the family homeless? n n

FE14 Is the family vulnerable to eviction

or in temporary accommodation? n n

FE15 Is the house and its immediate

surroundings safe for the child? n n

FE16 Does home have basic amenities? n n

FE17 Does home require any adaptations

to meet the child’s needs? n n

FE18 Is the home overcrowded?

FE19 Other n n

Employment

FE20 Is a parent in paid employment? n n

FE21 Does parent’s pattern of work

adversely impact on child care? n n

FE22 Is employment reasonably secure? n n

FE23 Are family members who seek

employment adequately supported? n n

FE24 Other n n

Income

FE25 Are all entitled benefits claimed? n n

FE26 Are household bills paid regularly? n n

FE27 Is the family managing on the

income they receive? n n

FE28 If in debt, is this increasing? n n

FE29 Is the family worried about

future financial commitments? n n

FE30 Other n n

Family’s Social Integration

FE31 Does the family feel accepted

within their community? n n

FE32 Do family members experience

discrimination/harassment? n n

FE33 Does the family have local friends? n n

FE34 Is the family involved in local

organisations/activities? n n

FE35 Other

Additional details as appropriate

Note identify of person for whom the issue is

relevant

Jobs may be lost

because parents’

circumstances result in

them behaving in a

bizarre or unpredictable

way.

Parents’ circumstances

may mean too much

family income is used to

satisfy parental needs.

Adult services may help

a disabled parent

respond to their child’s

needs.

The family may be

vulnerable to future

financial problems (i.e.

extraordinary medical,

funeral expenses, need

to help out a relative).

Social isolation and

rejection by the

community may have

affected the family for

generations.

Basic amenities include

safe water, heating,

cooking facilities, food

storage, sleeping

arrangements and

cleanliness.

The Home Conditions

Assessment may help

gather this information.

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 21 of 32

Community Resources Yes No

FE36 Are there accessible

community resources? n n

FE37 Does the family take advantage

of community resources? n n

FE38 Other n n

Additional details as appropriate

Social worker’s summary of how the family and environmental factors have an impact on the child and

parents’/carers’ capacities to respond appropriately to child’s needs.

Community resources

include: shops, play

areas, mother and

toddler groups, health

clinics etc.

In assessing community

resources note:

availability, accessibility

and standard, and if

appropriate to child and

family needs.

22 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Plan for the child in need

l Having completed the information gathering, the following pages should be

used to analyse the strengths and needs of the child and family members and to

identify goals and specific objectives. This information is then used to formulate

a plan of action. The decision about which methods are used and services are provided

to achieve specific objectives should be evidence based. The expectations of

a plan for a child in need are outlined in paragraphs 4.32 to 4.37 of the Framework

for the Assessment of Children in Need and Their Families (2000).

l The plan for a child in need has been designed to enable it to be used for all

children in need, including these about whom there are concerns they are

suffering or likely to suffer significant harm.

l The plan should identify how the following will be addressed:

l The identified developmental needs of the child;

l Issues which impact negatively on parents/carers’ capacity to respond to the

child and needs of their child, drawing on their strengths;

l Wider family and environmental factors which have a negative impact on the

child and family, drawing on strengths in the wider family and community.

l The plan should be specific about the actions to be taken, identify who is responsible

for each action, and any services or resources that will be required to ensure

that the objectives set can be achieved within the agreed time scales. Statutory

reviews should take place within statutory time limits and it is good practice for

Child In Need plans to be reviewed at least every 6 months. Reviews should be

formally recorded.

l The outcome section of the table should be completed following a review of the

plan. When completing the outcome section record the outcome for each

objective and whether the circumstances have; improved, remained the same, or

deteriorated.

l The last page records which family members and agencies are party to the plan

and the date when the plan will be reviewed. This should be signed by the child

(where appropriate), family members/carers and the social worker.

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 23 of 32

Summary of child’s developmental needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

Parents should be involved in the assessment

Summarise the child’s developmental needs and strengths

This space is for parents/carers to write their views of the child’s strengths and needs

24 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Summary of parenting capacity: Needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

Parents should be involved in the assessment

Summarise how the parental issues, needs and strengths, which have been identified in the core assessment have an

impact on the capacity of each parent/carer to respond appropriately to the child’s needs

This space is for parents/carers to write their views of their own strengths and difficulties and what impact they

think these have on the child’s development

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 25 of 32

Summary of wider family and environmental factors: Needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

Summarise how family and environment issues, which have been identified in the core assessment, have an impact

either directly on the child or on the capacity of the parents/carers to respond appropriately to the child’s needs

This space is for parents/carers to write their views of the strengths and difficulties in their wider family and

environment and what impact they think these have on the child’s development

Parents should be involved in the assessment

26 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Analysis of the information gathered during the core assessment

The analysis should list the factors which have an impact on different aspects of the child’s development and parenting

capacity, and explore the relationship between them. This process of analysing the information available about

the child’s needs, parenting capacity and wider family and environmental factors should result in a clear understanding

of the child’s needs, and what types of service provision would best address these needs to ensure the child has

the opportunity to achieve their potential

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 27 of 32

Health

Education

Identity:

Social

presentation

Family and

social

relationships

Emotional and

behavioural

development:

Selfcare skills

Child’s Objectives and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

developmental responsible be achieved

needs by (date)

The child: Objectives and plans

28 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Parenting Objective and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

capacity responsible be achieved

by (date)

The Parents/Carers: Objectives and plans

Basic care

Ensuring safety

Emotional

warmth

Stimulation

Guidance and

Boundaries

Stability

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 29 of 32

Family and Objective and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

environmental responsible be achieved

factors by (date)

Wider Family and Environmental Factors: Objectives and plans

Family history

and functioning

Wider family

Housing

Employment

and/or income

Family social

integration

Community

resources

30 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

Views of all parties

These objectives and plans should have been discussed with all interested parties/agencies

Family members/agencies who are party to the plan

Name (please print) Signature Contact Number

If the objectives and plans have not been discussed with any of the parties/agencies concerned, please give reasons

What steps will be taken and who is responsible if any party/agency wants to alter these objectives and plans?

Date plan reviewed in supervision Signature of Line Manger/Supervisor

Agreed date for the review:

Lead professional/agency for the review:

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years 31 of 32

Parents’/carers’ comments

I have seen the contents of this assessment form

Parent/carer’s signature Date

Parent/carer signature Date

Parents/carers comments on the assessment

Have all relevant family members

been given a copy of the assessment record? Yes n No n

If not, what arrangements have been made to ensure this happens?

Social Worker’s Signature Date

32 of 32 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 0–2 years

© Crown Copyright 2000 ISBN 0 11 322419 2

Management information

Ethnicity of the child:

Caribbean n Indian n White British n White and n Chinese n

Black Caribbean

African n Pakistani n White Irish n White and n Any other n

Black African ethnic group

Any other n Bangladeshi n Any other n White and n Not given n

Black background White background Asian

Any other Asian background n Any other mixed background n

If other, please specify

Immigration status if applicable:

Asylum seeking n Refugee status n Exceptional leave to remain n

Home Office registration number:

(H6) Details of immunisations:

Has the child been appropriately immunised? Yes n No n

2–4 months: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough, Polio, Hib, Men C 12–15 months: Measles/Mumps/Rubella

Child protection register:

Is the child’s name on the Child Protection Register? Yes n No n

Category Date of registration

Has the child previously been on the Child Protection Register? Yes n No n

Category Date of registration Date of deregistration

Court Order(s)

Is the child the subject of a court order? Yes n No n

Was the child previously subject of a court order? Yes n No n

Type of Order(s) Date Order(s) made: Type of Order(s) Date Order(s) made Date Order(s) revoked/changed

Document available

 

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Policyandguidance/Healthandsocialcaretopics/ChildrenServices/index.htm