CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 1 of 40

Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families

Name

Gender Date of birth

Address

Telephone number

Name of social worker completing assessment:

Young person aged 10Ė14 years

Health

Education

Emotional &

Behavioural

Development

Identity

Family & Social

Relationships

Social

Presentation

Selfcare Skills

Basic Care

Ensuring

Safety

Emotional

Warmth

Stimulation

Guidance

& Boundaries

Stability

CHILD

Safeguarding

and promoting

welfare

Family

History

& Functioning

Wider Family

Housing

Employment

Income

Familyís Social

Integration

Community

Resources

CHILDíS DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS

PARENTING CAPACITY

FAMILY & ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

2 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Undertaking the core assessment 3

Sources of information 4

Details concerning a core assessment 5

Background details concerning the young person 6

Key research sources 7

Young personís developmental needs 8

Health 8

Education 10

Emotional and Behavioural Development 12

Identity 14

Family and Social Relationships 16

Social presentation 18

Selfcare skills 20

Issues affecting parentsí/carersí capacities to respond appropriately

to the young personís needs 22

Family and Environmental factors 23

Plan for the Child in Need 26

Summary of young personís developmental needs and strengths 27

Summary of parenting capacity: Needs and strengths 28

Summary of family and environmental factors: Needs and strengths 29

Analysis of information gathered during the core assessment 30

The young person: Objectives and plans 31

The parent(s)/carer(s): Objectives and plans 32

Wider family and environmental factors: Objectives and plans 33

Views of all parties 34

Parentsí/carersí comments 35

Management information 36

Contents

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 3 of 40

l The Core Assessment Record provides a framework for systematically recording the findings

from the core assessment. Whilst the Assessment Record provides some guidance on

the areas that should be covered in a core assessment, it is a tool and should not be used as

a substitute for a professionally informed assessment process, analysis and judgement.

l The questionnaires and scales published in the accompanying materials to the Framework

for the Assessment of Child in Need and their Families may be useful in obtaining

the information in specific areas (Department of Health, Cox and Bentovim, 2000). The

Assessment Record indicates where particular questionnaires and scales may be useful.

Practitioners may also choose to use other assessment tools to assist them.

l The Core Assessment Record may be completed in a number of different ways. For example,

the social worker may wish to discuss each area with the family before completing the record

and then share this with the family. Alternatively, having undertaken some or all of the core

assessment the social worker may wish to complete the form with the childís parents or carers.

l Parents and carers invariably want to do the best for their children. Completing the

record will help social workers to recognise the strengths that families have as well as identifying

areas where they may need further help.

l Completing the core assessment should always be done in a way that helps parents or carers,

children and other relevant family members to have their say and encourages them to

take part. Space has been provided within the forms for parents/carers and older children

to be involved in the assessment.

l It is expected that other agencies should be involved as appropriate during the core assessment

process. Parental permission to contact other agencies should be obtained except in

cases where the safety of the child would be jeopardised (paragraphs 7.27 to 7.38 of

Working Together to Safeguard Children provides guidance on this issue). Permissions

should be obtained from other agencies to share their information with the family.

l It is important that all sections of the Core Assessment Record are considered carefully.

The analysis of the information gathered should be recorded in the plan. In some cases it

will not be appropriate to complete particular sections, and in such situations the reason

why should be recorded in the summary section. The information gathered is then used

to develop case objectives and plans.

l In competing the record, it should be possible to see what help and support the child and

family need, and which agencies might be best placed to give that help. This might

include more detailed assessments of specific issues.

l Families should be provided with the following information:

Complaints procedures date provided

Information on access to records date provided

Other relevant/available information date provided

(please specify)

Undertaking the core assessment

4 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Dates young person and family members seen

Name Date(s) seen

Agencies consulted/involved as part of the assessment

Agency Person Contact number

Questionnaires, Scales or other Instruments used in assessment

Questionnaire/Scale/Instrument Date(s) used

Specialist Assessments

Agency/person who undertook the Purpose of the assessment Date(s) assessment

assessment commissioned and completed

Sources of information

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 5 of 40

D1 What is the reason for undertaking the core assessment?

Details concerning a core assessment

D2 Are there specific communication needs for young person/parent (eg. impairment affecting communication or

English is not the first language)?

If so, what action has been taken to address this ie. use of an interpreter or a signer?

Date core assessment started

Date core assessment ended

The Governmentís Objectives for Childenís Social Services (1999) require the core assessment to be completed

within 35 working days.

6 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

B/K1 Significant relatives who are not part of the young personís household

Birth father Parental responsibility Yes n No n Name

Address

Brothers and sisters

Name(s) Age Address

Others (please specify )

Name(s) Relationship to child Address

Background details concerning the young person

(This information supplements the information recorded on the Referral and Initial Assessment Record)

B/K2 If the young person has any health conditions, impairment(s) or a genetically inherited condition Ė please

give details (include for example: physical disability, sensory impairment, Downís syndrome, encephalitis,

autism, sickle cell anaemia, cystic fibrosis)

B/K3 Key events which may have had an impact on the young person

(for example: death of brother or sister, circumstances surrounding conception)

B/K4 Other key events experienced by siblings or other family members which may affect the young person

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 7 of 40

Key research sources

The Assessment Record is based on research information drawn from a number of sources

Assessment

Cleaver H, Wattam C and Cawson P (1998) Assessing Risk in Child Protection. NSPCC, London.

Department of Health, Department for Education and Employment and Home Office (2000) Framework for the

Assessment of Child in Need and their Families. The Stationery Office, London.

Department of Health, Cox A and Bentovim A (2000) The Family Assessment Pack of Questionnaires and Scales.

The Stationery Office, London.

The NSPCC and University of Sheffield (2000) The Childís World: Assessing Children in Need. Training and

Development Pack. NSPCC, London.

Sinclair R, Garnett L and Berridge D (1995) Social Work and Assessment with Adolescents. National

Childrenís Bureau, London.

Ward H (ed) (1995) Looking After Children: Research into Practice. HMSO, London.

Child development

Department of Health (1996) Focus on Teenagers: Research into Practice. HMSO, London.

Department of Health (1997) Young Carers: Making a Start. Department of Health, London.

Fahlberg VI (1994) A Childís Journey Through Placement. BAAF, London.

Jones DPH (forthcoming) Communicating with children who may have been traumatised or maltreated.

Rutter R and Rutter M (1992) Developing Minds: Challenge and Continuity across the Life Span.

Penguin, Harmondsworth.

Smith PK and Cowie H (1993) Understanding Childrenís Development (2nd Edition). Blackwell, Oxford.

Varma VP (1991) The Secret Life of Vulnerable Children. Routledge, London.

Parenting capacity

Cleaver H, Unell I and Aldgate J (1999) Childrenís Needs ó Parenting Capacity: The impact of parental

mental illness, problem alcohol and drug use, and domestic violence on childrenís development.

The Stationery Office, London.

Falkov A, Mayes K, Diggins M, Silverdale N and Cox A(1998) Crossing Bridges ó Training resources for working with

mentally ill parents and their children. Pavilion Publishing, Brighton.

Reder, P and Lucey, C (1995) Assessment of Parenting: Psychiatric and psychological contributions.

Routledge, London.

Family and environmental factors

Cochran M (ed) (1993) Parenting: an ecological perspective. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey.

Cochran M, Larner M, Riley D, Gunnarsson L and Henderson C (eds) (1990) Extending families: the social

networks of parents and their children. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Jack G and Jordan B (1999) Social capital and child welfare. Children and Society. 13 (5): 242-256.

Wallace SA, Crown JM, Berger M and Cox AD (1997) Child and Adolescent Mental Health. In Stevens A and Rafferty J

(1997) Health Care Needs Assessment: 2nd Series. Radcliffe Medical Press, Oxford.

Iwanec D (1995) The emotionally abused and neglected child. Wiley, Chichester.

Stevenson O (1998) Neglected Children: Issues and Dilemmas. Blackwell Science, Oxford.

8 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Yes No

H1 Young person is normally well n n

H2 Experiences frequent accidents n n

H3 Physical development is satisfactory n n

H4 Has a chronic physical illness/

disability n n

H5 Experiences frequent infections n n

H6 Wets the bed at least monthly n n

H7 Soils without physical explanation n n

H8 Has a regular sleep pattern n n

H9 Has been appropriately immunised n n

H10 Is an occasional/non smoker n n

H11 Is not addicted to illicit drugs n n

H12 Regularly drinks alcohol with

other young people n n

H13 Eats an adequate, nutritious diet n n

H14 Has an accurate knowledge about

puberty, sex and contraception n n

H15 Has been/is pregnant or has

fathered a child n n

H16 Other n n

Young personís developmental needs

Health

Normally well is defined

as unwell for1 week or

less in the last 6

months.

Young people with

difficulties in verbal

communication should

use a form of signing.

Between 10 Ė14 young

people should have had

the following

immunisations: BCG

(tuberculosis).

Young people need

factual information

about puberty, sex and

contraception.

Half of conceptions to

under-age girls result in

live births.

Parenthood at this age

has long term

consequences for a

young personís life

chances.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

H17 A healthy diet is provided at home n n

H18 Illnesses receive appropriate

medical attention n n

H19 Injuries are attended to n n

H20 Parent ensures home is hygienic n n

H21 Other n n

Ensuring safety

H22 Periodic bouts of illness have a

recognised medical explanation n n

H23 Injuries have an understandable

accidental cause n n

H24 Marks on young personís body

have an acceptable explanation n n

H25 Other n n

To gather further

information consider

using the Home

Conditions

Assessment.

Black families may have

less access to

preventative and

support services than

white families.

Poverty and poor social

conditions are related to

poor health and

development and

increased risk of

accidents.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 9 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

H26 Parent encourages the young person

to take care of his/her own health n n

H27 Parent shows approval of the young

person taking care of own health n n

H28 Parent is sympathetic to the young

personís symptoms or injuries n n

H29 Other n n

Stimulation

H30 Parent promotes involvement in

physical activity n n

H31 Parent advises about health issues n n

H32 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

H33 Parent supports sex education n n

H34 Parent supports health education n n

H35 Parentís use of alcohol sets the

young person a good example n n

H36 Parent uses illicit drugs n n

H37 Other n n

Stability

H38 Parent ensures medical and dental

appointments are kept n n

H39 Parents support each other in

promoting/caring for the young

personís health n n

H40 Other n n

Increasing numbers of

children are suffering

obesity.

Regular physical

exercise is an important

preventative measure.

Disabled young people

may need special help

or equipment for

exercise.

Disabled or young

people with a health

problem need

information and

opportunities to help

them understand and

learn about themselves

When one parent is a

problem drinker, the

non drinking parent

may not always be able

to protect the young

person.

Parental problem drug

use is associated with

young people using

illicit drugs.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

10 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Education

Yes No date Subject level

E1 Young personís educational English

progress is at expected level Maths

Note SATs results n n Science

E2 Usually happy to go to school n n

E3 Attends school regularly

(note number of unauthorised days

absent in past year) n n

E4 Usually arrives at school on time n n

E5 Young person has a friend at school n n

E6 Young person is bullied at school n n

E7 Shows challenging/disruptive

behviour at school n n

E8 Has a good relationship with a

member of staff n n

E9 Young person responds positively

to teaching n n

E10 Young personís lack of

concentration impedes learning n n

E11 Young person has been

permanently excluded from school n n

E12 Other n n

SATs are given to pupils

in the summer term of

Years 2, 6, & 9 (ages 7,

11 & 14).

At 11 years most young

people are performing

at level 4: at 14 years

most perform at levels

5Ė6.

Black pupils often

underachieve at school

Black pupils are 4 times

more likely to be

excluded than white

pupils. Excluded black

children are usually of

higher ability with

fewer chronic

disruptive behaviours

than white children who

are excluded.

Non school attendance

may be related to

bullying.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

E13 Parent tries to ensure regular

school attendance n n

E14 Parent/carer supports and

encourages homework n n

E15 If the young person is not

achieving at school:

Is there an Individual

Education Plan? n n

Is there a statement of

Special Educational Needs? n n

E16 Other n n

Ensuring safety

E17 Parent tries to ensure the journey

to and from school is safe n n

E18 Where necessary, parents have

taken action over bullying n n

E19 Other n n

When a parent has a

learning disability only

15% of children are

similarly affected.

Not all young people

with impairments will

need a statement of

Special Educational

Needs.

Disabled young people

may need financial

help, equipment or

adaptations to enable

them to get to school.

Persistent non school

attendance can place

great strain on families.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 11 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents to responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

E20 Parent shows an interest in the

young personís school work n n

E21 Parent shows approval of

educational efforts and

achievements n n

E22 Parent supports the young person

over educational difficulties n n

E23 Parent places great pressure

on young person to achieve n n

E24 Other n n

Stimulation

E25 Parent encourages academic and

sporting activities n n

E26 Parent encourages the young

person to learn new skills n n

E27 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

E28 Parent tries to ensure prompt

school attendance n n

E29 Supports school rules/discipline n n

E30 Attempts to shield and support

the young person from family

problems that may interfere with

schooling n n

E31 Other n n

Stability

E32 Parent regularly attends school

events/parentsí meetings n n

E33 Young personís books/school

work are looked after n n

E34 Parents agree with each other in

supporting education n n

E35 Other n n

Parents own problems

may mean they are not

always able to offer the

intellectual stimulation

a young person of this

age needs.

To gather further

information consider

using the Family

Activity Scale.

All children need

adequate and

appropriate

stimulation. When a

young person has

profound or complex

impairments it may be

helpful to check with a

specialist before

completing this section.

Many young carers

believe that looking

after a parent or

younger sisters and

brothers interferes with

their schooling.

The key to childrenís

educational progress is

a parent or significant

adult who takes an

interest in their learning

and offers praise and

encouragement.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

12 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Emotional and Behavioural Development

Yes No

B1 Young person is usually happy n n

B2 Temper tantrums lasting 15 mins

occur monthly n n

B3 Frequently withdraws emotionally n n

B4 Often stays away from home/out

late without parental permission n n

B5 Has run away from home n n

B6 Young person copes with anger

and frustration n n

B7 Challenging/disruptive behaviours

affect young personís safety n n

B8 Enjoys appropriate physical

closeness with familiar adults n n

B9 Talks about feelings with a

trusted adult n n

B10 Shares/takes turns with others n n

B11 Inflicts injuries on him/herself

(i.e. scratching, cutting, head

banging) n n

B12 Is preoccupied with violence n n

B13 Bullies other children n n

B14 Respects the concept of ownership n n

B15 Has been cautioned or convicted

within past year (note number) n n

B16 Other n n

To gather further

information

consider using the

Strengths and

Difficulties

Questionnaire and The

Adolescent Well being

Scale.

When a young person

is disabled or sensory

impaired behaviours

such as rocking or

constant screaming are

significant and should

not be dismissed.

Young people may cope

with upsetting parental

behaviours by

withdrawing or

running away.

Self harm must be

treated seriously and

appropriate help

sought.

At this age concepts of

ownership are fully

established.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

B17 Parent/carer assures the young

person they will always be there

for them n n

B18 Family disagreements are

resolved in non-violent ways n n

B19 Other n n

Ensuring safety

B20 Parent tries to ensure whereabouts

of young person are known n n

B21 Young person is hit or physically

chastised n n

B22 Help is sought over unresolvable

relationship problems n n

B23 Other n n

Depression can affect

parentís capacity to care

about their child.

Most at risk are victims

of parental aggression

or neglect.

Consider whether the

feelings and behaviour

that troubles the young

person and parent

would benefit from

specialist assessment

and help.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 13 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

B24 Young person is comforted when

frightened or distressed n n

B25 Young person is exposed to

frequent criticism/hostility n n

B26 Young person is encouraged to

talk about fears and worries n n

B27 Other n n

Stimulation

B28 Young person is often exposed to

parentsí emotional distress n n

B29 Young person is encouraged to

share with others n n

B30 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

B31 Parent uses a variety of positive

methods to gain the young personís

co-operation/good behaviour n n

B32 There are clear family rules and

limits about behaviour n n

B33 Parent teaches respect for the law n n

B34 Young person is encouraged to help

with household tasks n n

B35 Parents do not burden the young

person with their own problems n n

B36 Young person is protected from

seeing frightening adult behaviour n n

B37 Other n n

Stability

B38 Young person responded to in a

consistent and predictable manner n n

B39 Parents/carers generally support

each other in applying family rules n n

B40 Other n n

Young people who are

abused or witness

family violence are

particularly

traumatised.

Discussing feelings

becomes more difficult

when a young person

depends on non-verbal

methods of

communication.

To gather further

information consider

using The Parenting

Daily Hassles Scale.

Positive methods for

encouraging cooperation

include:

praise, negotiation,

modelling, rewards,

distraction, play,

persuasion,

explanation.

When young people

witness violence they

have difficulty in

controlling their own

emotions and

behaviour.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

14 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Identity

Yes No

ID1 Young person is self confident n n

ID2 Takes pride in his/her appearance n n

ID3 Takes pride in achievements n n

ID4 Has a developing sense of his/her

own culture n n

ID5 Is comfortable with his/her own

racial identity n n

ID6 Is at ease with his/her sexual

orientation n n

ID7 Is confident when relating to

friends of either sex n n

ID8 Is able to make decisions on

appropriate matters n n

ID9 Blames him/herself for parentís

troubles n n

ID10 Feels everything is out of control n n

ID11 Other n n

Cultural identity

develops from all

aspects of a personís

experience.

The way in which black

disabled children define

themselves is affected

by their personal

experience of both

racism and disability.

Dual heritage does not

always result in identity

problems/conflicts.

Racism and bullying are

common-place in the

lives of black young

people.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

ID12 Clothes and appearance is in line

with the young personís wishes n n

ID13 Young personís clothes are

routinely washed n n

ID14 Parents see the young person as

having unique strengths and

encourages them n n

ID15 Other n n

Ensuring safety

ID16 Young personís dress is appropriate

for age, gender, culture and religion

and where necessary, impairment n n

ID17 Young person is supervised

appropriately taking into account

the childís personality and

developmental level n n

ID18 Young person is encouraged to

talk about worries and concerns n n

ID19 Parents support the young person

who is exposed to racism, bullying

or harassment n n

ID20 Other n n

Young people who

grow up in families

which experience many

stresses and problems

will need positive

messages to avoid

developing a negative

self image and poor self

esteem. Disabled young

people need even more

help.

Disabled young people

have a right to be

dressed appropriately

but their dress should

not impede movement,

endanger stability or

aggravate their skin.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 15 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

ID21 Parent often shows spontaneous

affection to the young person n n

ID22 Shows pride in the young person n n

ID23 Young personís efforts/

achievements are praised n n

ID24 Friendships are supported where

appropriate n n

ID25 Other n n

Stimulation

ID26 Has the opportunity to learn own

cultural traditions/language n n

ID27 Independence is encouraged n n

ID28 Is given control over appropriate

aspects of his/her life n n

ID29 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

ID30 Is taught respect and toleration n n

ID31 Family is tolerant of different

cultures, ethnic groups etc n n

ID32 Young person is protected from

parental mental illness/symptoms n n

ID33 Young person is reassured when

parentís behaviour is disturbing n n

ID34 Other n n

Stability

ID35 Is included in family celebrations n n

ID36 Is accepted as a family member n n

ID37 Parent ensures that day to day

living has order and stability n n

ID38 Other n n

For young people to

develop a positive self

image they need to feel

loved and valued for

themselves.

In all cultures disabled

young people may be

treated as younger than

their actual age. This is a

particular risk for

learning disabled

children.

Young people need

positive role models of

the same racial/ethnic

origins as him/ herself.

Young people often

suffer if they are

included in the

imaginary world of a

mentally ill parent.

Although at times

rebellious and moody,

most young people

remain integrated

within the family culture

and participate in

important family

celebrations.

Young people who are

routinely rejected come

to see themselves as

unloved and unlovable.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

16 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Family and Social Relationships

Yes No

F1 Young person has a strong,

positive relationship with a parent n n

F2 Young person has a close friend n n

F3 Bullies other children n n

F4 Is generally kind to younger

children and animals n n

F5 Regularly visits/spends time with

friends n n

F6 Has an adult in whom he/she

confides n n

F7 Sexual knowledge and

behaviour is age-appropriate n n

F8 Young person frequently looks

after brothers and sisters for long

periods n n

F9 Frequently looks after parent/carer n n

F10 Other n n

Young unaccompanied

asylum seekers

experience acute loss.

A close, supportive

friend can help young

people cope with family

problems.

Family values have

been internalised.

Young people can look

after younger siblings

and sick parents but

should not have overall

responsibility.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

F11 A small number of familiar

and appropriate adults look

after the young person n n

F12 Parent/carer spends enough time

with the young person to sustain a

strong relationship n n

F13 Other n n

Ensuring safety

F14 The relationship between the

young person and other children

in the family is generally good n n

F15 Parent monitors interactions

between young person and siblings n n

F16 Young person does not witness/

become involved in adult

sexual behaviour n n

F17 Does not witness/become involved

in adult violence n n

F18 Young person is frequently

left alone at night n n

F19 Other n n

Family issues or

difficulties experienced

by the young person

may result in him/ her

being looked after by a

large number of

different people (i.e.

family, friends, hospital

care, or social services

respite care).

A disabled child may

not protest when left

with strangers because

they have been handled

by many unknown

people. Nonetheless it

remains a matter for

concern.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 17 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

F20 Parents/carersí relationships

with others provides a good

example to the young person n n

F21 Parent/carer encourages

affectionate family relationships n n

F22 Other n n

Stimulation

F23 Young person has sufficient time

to pursue his/her own interests n n

F24 Sees friends outside school n n

F25 Has friends to visit at home n n

F26 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

F27 Is encouraged to negotiate n n

F28 Is discouraged from violent or

cruel behaviour n n

F29 Is given clear guidance on

appropriate sexual behaviour n n

F30 Task of caring for the family

is kept to a manageable level n n

F31 Parent tries to ensure young

person does not associate with

unsuitable adults/peers n n

F32 Other n n

Stability

F33 There is a stable pattern of care

to day to day life n n

F34 There is continuity of carers n n

F35 A limited number of known,

appropriate adults deliver

intimate care n n

F36 Other n n

Love and affection are

shown in different ways

depending on culture

and individual

characteristics.

A supportive adult can

help stressed parents to

cope.

Other young people

may be valuable sources

of support and can

greatly influence ideas

and actions.

When a young person

is disabled, practical and

social barriers can make

getting out difficult, but

it remains essential to

their wellbeing.

Young carers can feel

stigmatised and get

little recognition or

respect for their

contribution.

Of central importance

to a young person in all

families is a loving and

protective relationship.

Untrained agency staff

are not appropriate

people to care for a

disabled young person.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

18 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Social presentation

Yes No

P1 Young personís language and

behaviour do not cause offence or

embarrassment outside the family n n

P2 Personal hygiene is adequate n n

P3 Young person values adult attention n n

P4 Talks/communicates about family

without great difficulty n n

P5 Young person is self-confident and

appropriately open with adults n n

P6 Is willing to listen to the advice of

trusted and respected adults n n

P7 Young person is overly friendly

with strangers n n

P8 Young person is self-confident and

open with peers n n

P9 Young person spends time with

friends outside school hours n n

P10 Other n n

Young people have well

developed social skills.

They can readily adjust

their conversation and

behaviour to suit a

variety of different

situations.

Trusted and respected

adults can influence

young peopleís

behaviour.

Young people are very

conscious of their

appearance and

sensitive to criticism,

particularly from their

peers.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

P11 Parents/carers ensure that

personal hygiene is satisfactory n n

P12 Clothes and appearance are in line

with the young personís wishes n n

P13 Parents/carersí behaviour sets a

good example to the young person n n

P14 Other n n

Ensuring safety

P15 Parents/carers encourage the young

person to behave appropriately

with strangers n n

P16 Parents/carers teach appropriate

behaviour in public settings n n

P17 Parents/carers ensure the young

person is supervised/supported in

potentially dangerous settings n n

P18 Other n n

Young people may be

bullied or rejected at

school because their

clothes are soiled and

inappropriate, or their

personal hygiene is

poor.

The experience of

bullying, racism,

harassment or being left

out can lead to low self

esteem and may affect

the young personís

behaviour.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 19 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

P19 Parents/carers encourage the

young person to be self-confident n n

P20 Praise the young person for

good social behaviour n n

P21 Family members support each

other over decisions on the young

personís clothes and appearance n n

P22 Other n n

Stimulation

P23 Parents/carers encourage the

young person to bring his/her

friends home n n

P24 Give the young person the

opportunity to meet friends

outside school n n

P25 Allow some control over

clothes and appearance n n

P26 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

P27 Give guidance on appropriate

Ďgood mannersí and respect

for others n n

P28 Parentsí relationships with

neighbours and those in authority

are generally harmonious n n

P29 Family members are engaged in

criminal/antisocial activities n n

P30 Other n n

Stability

P31 Parents/carers engage in regular

social activities with other adults n n

P32 The family feels accepted by

the local community n n

P33 Other n n

When families are

experiencing difficulties

young people keep

silent because they fear

telling someone will

result in them Ďgetting

into troubleí, or being

Ďtaken awayí.

Young people often

shun social events or

keep friends at bay in an

attempt to keep the

familyís circumstances

secret.

Difficulties in relating

well with adults outside

the family, for example

teachers, may lead to

poor relationships,

feelings of detachment

and poor school results.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

20 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Selfcare skills

Yes No

S1 Young person has age appropriate

self care skills Ė can attend to own

personal hygiene (i.e. bathe, clean

teeth, brush hair) n n

S2 Has a realistic sense of personal

danger n n

S3 Can get drinks and do simple

cooking n n

S4 Can answer and use the telephone n n

S5 Young person accepts adult

help with day to day tasks with

reasonable grace n n

S6 Can travel alone on journeys the

parent/carer considers safe n n

S7 Can handle money and buy food

and clothes n n

S8 Can make own social arrangements n n

S9 Other n n

Older young people

without impairments

are generally able to

look after their personal

hygiene.

The personal hygiene of

younger teenagers may

need some monitoring.

Young people are able

to prepare simple meals,

use the telephone with

confidence and react

appropriately to an

emergency.

Young people often

wish to do things with

friends rather than

family.

Young personís needs Summary/clarification of young personís needs

Basic care Yes No

S10 Parent/carer takes main

responsibility for the day to day

care of the young person n n

S11 Parents/carers encourage the young

person to take responsibility for

aspects of self care appropriate to

age/stage of development n n

S12 Other n n

Ensuring safety

S13 A parent/carer monitors the

young personís self care to

ensure safety n n

S14 An adult has overall responsibility

for looking after the home n n

S15 Other n n

At this age it is expected

that young people will

help, but should not

have overall

responsibility for household

chores.

When parentsí own

concerns overwhelm

them young people

may be left responsible

for organising their day

to day living (i.e. bedtimes,

meals, getting to

school, cooking,

shopping, cleaning).

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 21 of 40

Social workerís summary of the young personís needs in this area and the extent to which parents are responding

appropriately

Emotional warmth Yes No

S16 Young person is praised for

appropriate self care including

cooking, shopping etc n n

S17 Other n n

Stimulation

S18 Young person is encouraged to

gain appropriate self care skills

(i.e. money management) n n

S19 Other n n

Guidance and Boundaries

S20 Parents place appropriate

boundaries on selfcare

activities according to the

young personís personality and

stage of development n n

S21 The young person is taught self

care and safety in and out of the

home (i.e. Ďstranger dangerí, how

to avoid/cope with every

day dangers) n n

S22 Young person knows how and

who to contact when help is

needed to cope with parental

issues n n

S23 Other n n

Stability

S24 There are stable arrangements

for living n n

S25 Parents/carers maintain the major

responsibility for the care of

the family n n

S26 Other n n

Parentsí own difficulties

may result in young

people assuming a

major role in looking

after the family.

Although young people

can help look after a sick

or disabled parent or

younger sisters and

brothers, an adult

should retain overall

responsibility.

Young carers may

become extremely

skilled in carrying out

everyday household

chores and in looking

after themselves.

Feeling responsible for

the family can lead

young carers to feel tied

to the home and unable

to join in outside leisure

and social activities.

Parental capacity Summary/clarification of family strengths or

issues identified

Note when issue is not relevant

22 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Social workerís summary of how the above issues have an impact on the parentsí/carersí capacities to respond

appropriately to the young personís needs

Issues affecting parentsí/carersí capacity to respond

appropriately to the young personís needs

C1 Illness:

Physical n n

Mental n n

C2 Disability:

Physical n n

Learning n n

Sensory impairment n n

C3 Period in care during

childhood n n

C4 Childhood abuse n n

C5 Known history of child abuse n n

C6 Known history of violence n n

C7 Problem drinking/ drug use n n

C8 Other n n

Parental issues Yes No Professional/agency Note identity of parent/carer for whom the issue

involved is relevant. Record strengths and difficulties

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 23 of 40

Family and environmental factors which may impact on the young person

and parenting capacity

Family History Yes No

FE1 Has a member of the household

experienced a stressful childhood? n n

Note childhood abuse; in care

FE2 Have the family suffered a

traumatic loss or crisis which is

unresolved? (e.g. bereavement) n n

FE3 Other n n

Family Functioning

FE4 Does young personís impairment/

behaviour have a negative impact

on siblings? n n

FE5 Young personís impairment/

behaviour affects parent(s) capacity

to continue care n n

FE6 Does a member of the household

experience:

poor mental health n n

poor physical health n n

behaviour problem n n

physical disability n n

learning disability n n

sensory impairment n n

problem alcohol/drug use n n

FE7 Has an adult member of the household

got a history of violence? n n

FE8 Are there frequent family rows? n n

FE9 Other n n

Wider Family

FE10 Do wider family provide:

practical help n n

emotional support n n

financial help n n

information and advice n n

FE11 Is there an adult in the home who

helps the parent care for the

young person? n n

FE12 Other n n

Include all household

and relevant family

members, living in or

out of the home, when

exploring family history

and functioning.

To gather further

information consider

using: The Recent Life

Events Questionnaire;

A genogram; An eco

map.

How parents bring up

their children is rooted

in their own childhood

experiences.

Consider whether a

separate carersí

assessment is required.

Both positive and

negative parenting

styles can be passed

from one generation to

another.

To gather further

information consider

using: The Adult Wellbeing

Scale; The

Alcohol Scale.

Wider family may

extend beyond blood

relatives to include

people who feel like

family to parent or

child.

Additional details as appropriate

Note identity of person for whom the issue is

relevant

24 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Housing Yes No

FE13 Is the family homeless? n n

FE14 Is the family vulnerable to eviction

or in temporary accommodation? n n

FE15 Is the house and its immediate

surroundings safe for the young

person? n n

FE16 Does home have basic amenities? n n

FE17 Does home require any adaptations

to meet the young personís needs? n n

FE18 Is the home overcrowded?

FE19 Other n n

Employment Yes No

FE20 Is a parent in paid employment? n n

FE21 Does parentís pattern of work

adversely impact on child care? n n

FE22 Is employment reasonably secure? n n

FE23 Are family members who seek

employment adequately supported? n n

FE24 Other n n

Income

FE25 Are all entitled benefits claimed? n n

FE26 Are household bills paid regularly? n n

FE27 Is the family managing on the

income they receive? n n

FE28 Does the young person receive an

appropriate allowance n n

FE29 If in debt, is this increasing? n n

FE30 Is the family worried about

future financial commitments? n n

FE31 Other n n

Familyís Social Integration

FE32 Does the family feel accepted

within their community? n n

FE33 Do family members experience

discrimination/harassment? n n

FE34 Does the family have local friends? n n

FE35 Is the family involved in local

organisations/activities? n n

FE36 Other n n

Additional details as appropriate

Note identity of person for whom the issue is

relevant

Jobs may be lost

because parentsí

circumstances result in

them behaving in a

bizarre or unpredictable

way.

Parentsí circumstances

may mean too much

family income is used to

satisfy parental needs.

Adult services may help

a disabled parent

respond to their childís

needs.

The family may be

vulnerable to future

financial problems (i.e.

extraordinary medical,

funeral expenses, need

to help out a relative).

Social isolation and

rejection by the

community may have

affected the family for

generations.

Basic amenities include

safe water, heating,

cooking facilities, food

storage, sleeping

arrangements and

cleanliness.

The Home Conditions

Assessment may help

gather this information.

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 25 of 40

Community Resources Yes No

FE37 Are there accessible

community resources? n n

FE38 Does the family take advantage

of community resources? n n

FE39 Other n n

Additional details as appropriate

Social workerís summary of how the family and environmental factors have an impact on the young person and

parents/carers

Community resources

include: shops,

recreation areas, afterschool

clubs, health

clinics etc.

In assessing community

resources note:

availability, accessibility

and standard and if

appropriate to child and

family needs.

26 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Plan for the child in need

l Having completed the information gathering, the following pages should be

used to analyse the strengths and needs of the child and family members and to

identify goals and specific objectives. This information is then used to formulate

a plan of action. The decision about which methods are used and services are provided

to achieve specific objectives should be evidence based. The expectations of

a plan for a child in need are outlined in paragraphs 4.32 to 4.37 of the Framework

for the Assessment of Children in Need and Their Families (2000).

l The plan for a child in need has been designed to enable it to be used for all

children in need, including these about whom there are concerns they are suffering

or likely to suffer significant harm.

l The plan should identify how the following will be addressed:

l The identified developmental needs of the child;

l Issues which impact negatively on parents/carersí capacity to respond to the

child and needs of their child, drawing on their strengths;

l Wider family and environmental factors which have a negative impact on the

child and family, drawing on strengths in the wider family and community.

l The plan should be specific about the actions to be taken, identify who is responsible

for each action, and any services or resources that will be required to ensure

that the objectives set can be achieved within the agreed time scales. Statutory

reviews should take place within statutory time limits and it is good practice for

Child In Need plans to be reviewed at least every 6 months. Reviews should be

formally recorded.

l The outcome section of the table should be completed following a review of the

plan. When completing the outcome section record the outcome for each

objective and whether the circumstances have; improved, remained the same, or

deteriorated.

l The last page records which family members and agencies are party to the plan

and the date when the plan will be reviewed. This should be signed by the child

(where appropriate), family members/carers and the social worker.

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 27 of 40

Summary of young personís developmental needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

The young person (where appropriate) and parents should be involved in the assessment

Summarise the young personís developmental needs and strengths

This space is for young people and parents/carers to write their views of the young personís strengths and needs

28 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Summary of parenting capacity: Needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

The young person (where appropriate) and parents should be involved in the assessment

Summarise how the parental issues, needs and strengths, which have been identified in the core assessment have an

impact on the capacity of each parent/carer to respond appropriately to the young personís needs

This space is for the young person and parents/carers to write their views of their own strengths and difficulties and

what impact they think these have on the young personís development

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 29 of 40

Summary of wider family and environmental factors: Needs and strengths

Information gathered in the core assessment

Summarise how family and environment issues, which have been identified in the core assessment, have an impact

either directly on the young person or on the capacity of the parents/carers to respond appropriately to the young

personís needs

This space is for the young person and parents/carers to write their views of the strengths and difficulties in their

wider family and environment and what impact they think these have on the young personís development

The young person (where appropriate) and parents should be involved in the assessment

30 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Analysis of the information gathered during the core assessment

The analysis should list the factors which have an impact on different aspects of the young personís development

and parenting capacity, and explore the relationship between them. This process of analysing the information

available about the young personís needs, parenting capacity and wider family and environmental factors should

result in a clear understanding of the young personís needs, and what types of service provision would best address

these needs to ensure the young person has the opportunity to achieve their potential

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 31 of 40

Young personís Objectives and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

developmental responsible be achieved

needs by (date)

The young person: Objectives and plans

Health

Education

Emotional

and behavioural

development

Identity

Family and

social

relationships

Social

presentation

Selfcare skills

32 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Parenting Objective and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

capacity responsible be achieved

by (date)

The parents/carers: Objectives and plans

Basic care

Ensuring safety

Emotional

warmth

Stimulation

Guidance and

Boundaries

Stability

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 33 of 40

Family and Objective and plan of action Person/Agency Objective to Outcome (to be completed at the review)

environmental responsible be achieved

factors by (date)

Wider Family and Environmental Factors: Objectives and plans

Family history

and functioning

Wider family

Housing

Employment

and/or income

Family social

integration

Community

resources

34 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Views of all parties

These objectives and plans should have been discussed with all interested parties/agencies

Family members/agencies who are party to the plan

Name (please print) Signature Contact Number

If the objectives and plans have not been discussed with any of the parties/agencies concerned, please give reasons

What steps will be taken and who is responsible if any party/agency wants to alter these objectives and plans?

Date plan reviewed in supervision Signature of Line Manger/Supervisor

Agreed date for the review:

Lead professional/agency for the review:

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 35 of 40

Parents/carerís comments

I have seen the contents of this assessment form

Parent/carerís signature Date

Parent/carer signature Date

Parents/carers comments on the assessment

Have all relevant family members

been given a copy of the assessment record? Yes n No n

If not, what arrangements have been made to ensure this happens?

Social Workerís Signature Date

36 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Management information

Ethnicity of the young person:

Caribbean n Indian n White British n White and n Chinese n

Black Caribbean

African n Pakistani n White Irish n White and n Any other n

Black African ethnic group

Any other n Bangladeshi n Any other n White and n Not given n

Black background White background Asian

Any other Asian background n Any other mixed background n

If other, please specify

Immigration status if applicable:

Asylum seeking n Refugee status n Exceptional leave to remain n

Home Office registration number:

(H9) Details of immunisations:

Has the young person been appropriately immunised? Yes n No n

Between 10Ė14 young people should have and the following immunisations: BCG (tuberculosis) and if school leavers aged 13:

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio.

(H15) Childbirth

The girl has been/is pregnant Yes n No n

The boy has fathered a child Yes n No n

Child protection register:

Is the young personís name on the Child Protection Register? Yes n No n

Category Date of registration

Has the young person previously been on the Child Protection Register? Yes n No n

Category Date of registration Date of deregistration

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 37 of 40

Court Order(s)

Is the young person the subject of a court order? Yes n No n

Was the young person previously subject of a court order? Yes n No n

Type of Order(s) Date Order(s) made: Type of Order(s) Date Order(s) made Date Order(s) revoked/changed

Education details of the young person

(E1) SATs results show young person at the end of Key Stage 3 (child of 14) performs at level 5Ė6 for:

English Yes n No n

Maths Yes n No n

Science Yes n No n

(E3) Number school days missed within past year through unauthorised absence

(E11) Young person is excluded from school Yes n No n

(B15) Offending within the past year

Number of cautions within the past year

Number of convictions within the past year

Additional Management Information

38 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

Additional Notes

CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years 39 of 40

Additional Notes

40 of 40 CORE ASSESSMENT RECORD Child aged 10Ė14 years

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